Biology Department photograph montage

Gretchen LeBuhn

Professor robertpatterson
Professor
University of California, Santa Barbara
At SFSU Since: 
2001
Office: 
Hensill 741
Office Phone: 
(415) 405-0729
Specialties: 
Sierra nevada ecology, urban ecology, conservation biology, plant evolutionary ecology, solitary bee population and community ecology, monitoring, climate change in alpine environments

I am interested in both the evolutionary ecology of plants and the conservation of their pollinators. My lab focuses on the effects of climate change on bumble bee species in alpine environments as well as the effects of urbanization on wildlife. I direct the Great Sunflower Project, a citizen science project, designed to evaluate the effects of landscape change on pollinator service in North America.

My lab works in areas as diverse as the northern Sierra Nevada mountains, San Francisco city parks, Andes of Ecuador and vineyard areas of California. We also work on developing effective and cost-efficient ways to monitor bees and other wildlife. I am also interested in the effects of variation in flower phenology on plant reproductive success. We use Linanthus dichotmous, a plant that flowers during the day north of San Francisco and at night south of San Francisco, as a model system.

 

Recent publications:

1. Winfree, R. R. Aguilar, D. Vazquez, G. LeBuhn and M. Aizen. 2009. A meta-analysis of bees’ responses to anthropogenic disturbance. Ecology 90(8): 2068-2076.

2. Colloran, B. and G. LeBuhn. Accepted. The Benefits of Meadow Restoration for Pollinators. In: T. Root and K. Hall eds. Biological Impacts of Climate Change in California

3. LeBuhn, G. and C. Fenter*. 2008. Landscape context influences bumble bee communities in oak woodland habitats. Pages 301-306 in A. Merenlender, D. McCreary, and K. Purcell, technical coordinators. Proceedings of the 6th California oak symposium: today's challenges, tomorrow's opportunities. 9-12 October 2006; Rohnert Park, CA. Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR. Albany, CA: Pacific Southwest Research Station, Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture; In Press.

4. Reynolds, M. , T. Gardali, M. Merrifield*, R. Hirsch-Jacobsen*, A. Armstrong,D. Wood, J.Smith, E. Heaton*, and G. LeBuhn. 2008. Reproductive Success of Oak Woodland Birds in Sonoma and Napa Counties, California Pages 433-436. in A. Merenlender, D. McCreary, and K. Purcell, technical coordinators. Proceedings of the 6th California oak symposium: today's challenges, tomorrow's opportunities. 9-12 October 2006; Rohnert Park, CA. Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR. Albany, CA: Pacific Southwest Research Station, Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture; In Press.

5. *Chess, S., R. Raguso and G. LeBuhn. 2008. Divergence in floral scent and morphology of Linanthus dichotomus. American Journal of Botany 95:1652-1659.

6. *Clarke, K., B. Fisher, and G. LeBuhn. 2008. The influence of urban park characteristics on ant (Hymenoptera, Formicidae) communities. Urban ecosystems 11:317-334.

7. Packer, L., Gravel, A-I*. , and G. LeBuhn. 2007. Phenology and Sociobiology of Halictus tripartitus (Seladonia). J. Hym. Res.16:281-292.

8. *Hatfield, R. and G. LeBuhn. 2007. Patch and landscape factors shape community assemblage of bumble bees, Bombus spp. (Hymenoptera: Apidae), in montane meadows. Biological Conservation 139:150-158.

9. Weller, S. G., C. A. Dominguez, F. E. Molina-Freaner, J. Fornoni, and G. LeBuhn. 2007. The Evolution of Heterostyly in Populations of Oxalis alpine in the Sky Islands of the Sonoran Desert. American Journal of Botany. 94: 972-985.

10. *Chaves, J., J. Pollinger, T. B. Smith and G. LeBuhn. 2007. The role of geography and ecology in shaping the phylogeography of the speckled hummingbird (Adelomyia melanogenys) in Ecuador. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 43:795-807.